Umass officials lead state’s top earners _ news _ eagletribune. com

BOSTON — Gov. Cleaning lady pictures Charlie Baker might be the state’s top official, but his pay lags many of those who work for him.

More than 2,700 state employees – athletic coaches, judges, district attorneys, university administrators, police officials and professors – earned more than the state’s chief executive last year, according to newly released payroll figures.

Baker, who recently turned down a raise that would have bumped his compensation by more than $33,000 a year, took home $151,800 in 2016.

As in previous years, University of Massachusetts employees were among the top earners of the state’s 126,000-plus workforce in calendar year 2016. Cleaning lady resume The top paid worker was UMass basketball coach Derek Kellogg, who collected $1.06 million, according to payroll data.

That includes Kellogg’s base salary and other compensation, including bonuses and franchise payments for broadcasting games and media appearances.


Kellogg was followed closely by Michael Collins, UMass chancellor and senior vice president of health sciences, who made $938,000.

UMass President Marty Meehan roped in $593,000 in 2016, according to the state’s data. Cleaning lady funny pictures Meehan, a former congressman and UMass Lowell chancellor, took over the five-campus state university system in 2015.

Other UMass chancellors, deans and administrators also ranked high on the salary list.

UMass spokesman Jeff Cournoyer noted that only 22 percent of the university system’s revenue comes from the state.

“The vast majority of UMass’ payroll is supported by non-state revenue, which includes grants and auxiliary revenues,” he said in an email.

UMass conducts surveys and hires consultants to compare its salaries to those of other public colleges, he said. House cleaning list for maid in spanish It sets pay at levels deemed necessary to attract talented professionals and academics.

Payroll in the UMass system grew by $40 million between 2015 and 2016, which university officials said was due to increases in collective bargaining obligations.

“We’re the second-largest employer in the state, public or private, so it stands to reason that we are proportionately represented in every tier on the payroll list,” Cournoyer said.

Mary Connaughton, director of government transparency at the Pioneer Institute, a Boston-based think tank that supports smaller government, suggested that a growing payroll in the state university system is becoming “unsustainable.”

“The higher echelons of the university seem to be a cozy club of well-paid executives,” she said.

Connaughton noted the university system’s tuition rates increased last year.

“Ultimately this impacts what students have to pay for tuition and fees,” she said. Flylady cleaning tips “When costs become too high, that puts UMass out of reach for students who can’t afford it.”

Last year’s payroll data are posted on the state’s “Open Checkbook” website, which was created to make government spending more transparent.

The data include salary and other compensation, such as overtime, back pay and retirement payouts.

Overall, the state’s payroll costs dropped about $38.8 million last year — the first decline in at least 16 years, according to the state comptroller’s office.

About $6.8 billion was spent on state employee pay last year, a 0.6 percent decline from 2015.

The Baker administration attributes the decline to efforts to reduce costs, including a hiring freeze, spending cuts and an early retirement program.

Payroll costs represented about 18 percent of the state’s $39 billion budget last year.

The payroll data do not include the MBTA or other independent agencies that handle their own payrolls.

And not everyone on Beacon Hill brings home a six-figure salary.

The average pay among all state workers last year was $54,343 — slightly lower than the previous year.

Christian M. Lady genius cleaning Wade covers the Massachusetts Statehouse for North of Boston Media Group’s newspapers and websites. Cleaning lady images cartoons Email him at cwade@cnhi.com.

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